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The Pacific Northwest of the United States is best known for its gorgeous coastline, green interior, rainy weather, and astounding mountains. This region is comprised of states Montana, Wyoming as well as areas in Idaho, British Columbia and Alaska.
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Olympic Peninsula, Washington State

Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula offers delightful landscapes to explore: alpine meadows, rainforest
valleys and more than 70 miles of wild Pacific coastline. Enjoy small, friendly towns, scenic byways and magical waterfalls. Savor Olympic Coast Cuisine all along the way!

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Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula is located in the northwest corner of Washington State, west of Seattle across the waters
of Puget Sound. The Peninsula is home to Olympic National Park, the United States’ third most-visited of the western National Parks with nearly a million acres and over 900 miles of hiking trails. In the center of the peninsula are the Olympic Mountains with 60 glaciers. To the west are the dense rainforest valleys where rainfall can approach 200 inches a year, and 73 miles of hikeable, pristine, Pacific coastline that is accessible by car in only a few places. In the rainshadow of the mountains, Sequim (‘Skwim’) enjoys the lowest annual rainfall in western Washington! The Peninsula is bordered to the north by the Strait of Juan de Fuca with easy access to Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and to the east by the Hood Canal, a 60-mile long glacier-carved fjord. US Hwy 101 encircles the Peninsula, touching towns and special places with access to many more. The entire Peninsula has a rural nature, with around 135,000 residents in a 3.5 million acre region, Port Angeles the largest town with around 20,000 people. The incredible array of waterfront, wilderness and wildlife make the Olympic Peninsula a nature lovers’ dream-come-true. Don’t miss the Strait of Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway, the Victorian Seaport of Port Townsend, the glacier-carved Hood Canal, The Makah Museum and Cape Flattery and the Olympic Peninsula Waterfall Trail. Climate is mild year round, with highs rarely over 80 and infrequent, short-lived snowfalls.

Website: http://www.OlympicPeninsula.org

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Permalink: http://wa.olympicpeninsula.travelguides.com/travel-guides-olympic-peninsula-wa-2898.html
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Pullman, WA

There is no place on the planet quite like the Palouse. We are a region 3-4,000 mile of distinct geological formation with rich and fertile soil for growing wheat, peas, barley and lentils, which are abundantly produced in our region.

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Pullman, the largest city in the county and home of the National Lentil Festival. Rich as a college town, with Washington State University and all the vibrancy that a Pac-12 university brings to a community. The arts are alive in our theatres, museums, and music. Pullman offers fine food, a world class golf course, lodging and shopping options which will easily round out each visitor’s experience.
From Pullman, head north, south or west where you’ll find plenty of eye candy along the 208 miles of the Palouse Scenic Byway.
About an hour north, Steptoe Butte rises 3,618’ into the sky with a spectacular 360-degree view of the area. Going west, you’ll find Palouse Falls State Park which emerges from the channeled scablands of arid southeastern Washington, a longer cascade than Niagara Falls. Just twenty minutes north will put you at Kamiak Butte and a short hike from the base will put you sky-high overlooking the rich farmlands with over 150 bird, mammal, and vegetation species. A twenty-minute jaunt south will get you to the Dahmen Barn, which is fenced in over 1,000 steel wagon wheels.
Incredible sights, nature in bloom, panoramic landscapes and friendly!

Website: www.PullmanChamber.com

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Permalink: http://www.travelguidesfree.com/Brochures/Pacific_Northwest/Washington/1034/Pullman-WA.html
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  • Discover Klamath_Travel Guide Cover
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Discover Klamath, Oregon

Ahh, Klamath! The very home of Crater Lake National Park. Half a hop from the Lava Beds National Monument. You really need to get down here and see it! Come on. Meet me in Klamath!

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Klamath County is smack dab in the middle of the largest migratory bird route in the west, Native American and World War II sites that will really get you thinking. Raft on class IV whitewater or serenely drift on meandering rivers chock full of ravenous trout that practically leap into your boat. Oh and centuries of stunning cycling and mountain biking. Hiking? Oh, yes there's hiking. And did I mention Crater Lake? I did! Well, there's just so much to do here, you really need to get down here and see it for yourself. Come on. Meet me in Klamath!

Website: http://www.meetmeinklamath.com/

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Permalink: http://www.travelguidesfree.com/Brochures/Pacific_Northwest/Oregon/1101/Discover-Klamath-Oregon.html
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Willamette Valley, OR

Welcome to the Oregon Wine Country, where wine is just the beginning. From historic towns to quirky cities, craft breweries to farm stands, the Willamette Valley offers inviting escapes up and down every curve of the river corridor.

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With more than 500 wineries to choose from, the Willamette Valley is a great destination for wine lovers – but you'll discover that there’s more to Oregon Wine Country than what’s in the glass.

The story of the Willamette Valley, a destination for dreamers, was one born of geological calamity. At the end of the last ice age, at least 25 massive floods swept westward through the Columbia River Gorge, depositing rich, diverse soils in the 150-mile stretch between Portland and Eugene. Today the Willamette Valley’s abiding allure has everything to do with these soils — its farm-to-fork food scene, a world-class wine industry and the pioneering nature of its people, who come here to build, to make and to live the good life.

You'll find lush vineyards and farms, tended by families who are passionate about growing the best wine grapes and freshest foods. You’ll meet chefs who turn this bounty into mouthwatering farm-to-table cuisine. You’ll sip some of the world’s finest Pinot noir. And you’ll discover rivers, trails and mountains beckoning to your inner explorer.

Oregon Wine Country is recognized as one of the premier Pinot noir producing areas in the world but other cool-climate varieties such as Pinot gris, Pinot blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling and Gewürztraminer are equally at home here.

Visit us the Willamette Valley. Where wine is just the beginning.

Website: www.OregonWineCountry.org

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Permalink: http://www.travelguidesfree.com/Brochures/Pacific_Northwest/Oregon/1107/Willamette-Valley-OR.html
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  • Fairbanks Alaska 2018 Visitor Guide_Cover

Fairbanks, Alaska

Be inspired by the light of the Aurora Borealis. Renew your energy under the Midnight Sun. Experience the warmth of Fairbanks—Alaska’s Golden Heart—and the gateway to Denali, Interior and Arctic Alaska.

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Take a deep breath and explore Fairbanks! With the midnight summer sun shining nearly 24 hours a day, Fairbanks is bursting with energy and things to do. Get lucky panning for gold, float the Chena River, mingle with reindeer, cool off in an ice museum, take a refreshing hike and look for wildlife, or be inspired by art galleries, museums and historic sites.

August 21 through April 21, during Aurora Season, you have a great chance to see the shimmering light of the aurora borealis. Fairbanks’ top-of-the-world location makes it one of the best places on earth to see the captivating northern lights. A host of other fascinating activities and events await you during the winter.

Located in the “Golden Heart” of our great state, Fairbanks is the basecamp to Alaska’s Interior and Arctic—areas that offer adventures many people only dream about. Denali National Park is two hours away; the Arctic Circle is a five to six hour drive; villages without road access, refuges and parks are just a short flight away.

Once a gold rush boomtown, now called the “Golden Heart of Alaska,” visitors find Fairbanks inviting, engaging and awe-inspiring—the heart of the last frontier.

Website: www.explorefairbanks.com

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Permalink: http://www.travelguidesfree.com/Brochures/Pacific_Northwest/Alaska/269/Fairbanks-Alaska.html
Anchorage Alaska Visitors Guide

    Visit Anchorage

    Discover 60 of Alaska’s most accessible glaciers, 1,500 resident moose and 300 miles of wilderness trails; living large just comes naturally in Anchorage. Order your free Official Guide to Anchorage today.

    More on Visit Anchorage

    With the midnight sun high overhead, the boreal forest of the Chugach Mountains looming on the horizon, and the sparkling waters of Cook Inlet summoning like a siren, Anchorage, Alaska, is a world class destination providing endless possibilities for adventure and entertainment.

    Anchorage has a singular blend of the wilderness adventures Alaska is known for – the massive Chugach State Park shares a boundary with the city – and urban amenities. Long summer days allow plenty of time for adventures. Anglers cast for monster salmon in Ship Creek, steps from the center of downtown. More than 135 miles of paved multi-use trails weave through the city, and visitors can discover Alaska Native cultures, soar over North America’s tallest peaks, or watch glaciers calve in a thunderous roar. Winter holds great prospects for skating skiing, and dog sledding under the northern lights. With 1,200 resident moose, as well as eagles, fox and beluga whales, Anchorage, Alaska is a city with larger-than-life experiences. Savor the tastes of Alaska at Anchorage restaurants. Chefs incorporate local produce plucked from markets and farms and cooked with Alaska flair. The city is also Alaska’s cultural and arts capital, attracting Broadway shows, world-famous entertainers and master musicians.

    Website: www.Anchorage.net

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    Permalink: http://www.travelguidesfree.com/Brochures/Pacific_Northwest/Alaska/268/Visit-Anchorage.html

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